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Traversing the Fantasy

by Juliette Lord   Adam Martinakis produces remarkable computer-generated visual artwork with an other-wordly quality. Born in Lubań, Poland in 1972 and of mixed Polish and Greek descent, Marinakis has been exhibiting across Europe since 2005. Most

by Juliette Lord

 

Adam Martinakis produces remarkable computer-generated visual artwork with an other-wordly quality. Born in Lubań, Poland in 1972 and of mixed Polish and Greek descent, Marinakis has been exhibiting across Europe since 2005. Most recently he held a solo exhibition entitled “Metaverse”, at the Galleri Oxholm, Copenhagen, Denmark. I caught up with him on his return to talk about his work.

 

Adam Martinakis

 

I ask him how he manages to combine this ‘otherness’ to his art with a very personal resonance, which impacts with the viewer on a highly emotional level. He explains:

 

“I’m trying to find the common ground between the personal and the universal truth. This can be only achieved, in my opinion, if you try to look at things from a different, a distant level. Distant, not only from yourself but also from your time and your place. This is also at the same time a combination of reality and fantasy. I believe, everybody in his own special way crosses the bridge between the personal and the universal, by nature, that is why many people find my work familiar.”

 

To create the intricate figures that make up much of his oeuvre he employs a combination of 3D software. The basic structure of the models are made using the 3d modelling, animation and rendering design software 3ds Max. To produce more detail objects this is supplemented with digital painting and sculpting software such as Mudbox or Zbrush, enabling him to paint and texture the mesh figures.

 

These mesh figures are incredibly ‘human’ despite many of them being literally featureless. The spatial positioning of the ‘bodies’ and the sculptural forms which they create, manage to not only tell a distinct narrative but invoke a poignancy and fragility indicative of the human condition. They simultaneously futuristic and contemporary.

 

Although Martinakis sometimes starts off with a very definite image in mind, more often the piece takes on a life of its own, evolving as it is created. Martinakis tells me:

 

“In most of the artworks the piece itself is guiding you to an unknown direction. This can be applied to the color scheme but also to all the other elements of the creation. I believe that creating art is traveling to the depths of existence.”

 

And while Martinakis cites the art movements of the early 20th century as major influences in both his philosophical and visual approach to creativity, he says that:

 

“I’m always quite open for any new inspirations. I don’t exclude the possibility to change to a different direction if I feel to do so, in the future.”

 

He has another exhibition planned for the Fall 2015 in Ibiza (Spain) but after that he wants to return to producing a new line of artworks rather than spending his time exhibiting. I for one cannot wait to see what he produces next.

 

For more information on Adam Martinakis check out his website: martinakis.com. And his blog: adamakis.blogspot.co.uk

thelma.lay@mymaniera.com

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1 COMMENT
  • Latoya July 27, 2016

    That’s a we-uotholghtl-ut answer to a challenging question

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